Fungi Fridays: Unknown*

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Unsure about the ID of these, and all my research on fungi foraging warns against picking any little brown mushrooms (called LBMs). Nice to look at, regularly not so nice to eat 🍴 the little brown ones are commonly difficult to ID and land many a brave soul in the hospital. They’re a huge reason why many adults tell children all mushrooms are poisonous (when it’s not nearly that simple, but I get it – better safe than sorry!). It’s possible they’re edible, but not likely enough to chance it without further info. I’m thinking they might be mycena? I have no clue though ><

πŸ„πŸ„πŸ„

Genus: Unknown

Species: Unknown

Edibility: Unknown

Disclaimer: This site is provided for informational purposes only. Taylor assumes no responsibility or liability for any consequences of readers actions. Though every reasonable effort is made to present current and accurate information, identifications may be incorrect (Taylor is a novice) – but that’s where community input helps! Please, feel free to correct misinformation you find (or just add your two cents) in the comments!
Happy foraging!

Fungi Fridays: Bear Bread mushroom*

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Here’s an Artist’s Conk (less commonly known as Bear Bread) fungus Sam crossed a river to cut down – he’s a big fan of Samwise Gamgee from LOTR, and I happen to be as well – sorry Frodo – so Teamwise was born!

The Artist’s Conk (Ganoderma applanatum) is a bracket fungus that grows within the wood of living and dead trees. It is a saprobicΒ wood-decay fungus (meaning it colonizes rotting wood and dead organic matter), and it is quite inedible. But, though I can’t imagine the hungry forager who would deem this fungus edible, this fungus is also called “Bear Bread” for the obvious reasons.

Sam took a big dunk in the river to get this fungus too :O I recorded him making the trip across, and I’ll likely post videos on my Instagram of his trials and tribulations (thanks again Samwise!)

πŸ„πŸ„πŸ„

Genus: Ganoderma

Species: applanatum

Edibility: inedible

 

Disclaimer: This site is provided for informational purposes only. Taylor assumes no responsibility or liability for any consequences of readers actions. Though every reasonable effort is made to present current and accurate information, identifications may be incorrect (Taylor is a novice) – but that’s where community input helps! Please, feel free to correct misinformation you find (or just add your two cents) in the comments!
Happy foraging!

 

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Fungi Fridays: Turkey Tail mushroom*

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Trametes versicolor

(NOTE: I know today is Saturday – but the post didn’t publish yesterday as scheduled for some reason 😦 wonder why…got some sleuthing to do!)

Nothing like the famed bird so fondly consumed on Turkey Day, these ‘shrooms are in the polypore family. I’ve seen some polypore species cooked (@mallorylodonnell has great fungi cooking pics on Instagram, I love her feed) but they aren’t considered “choice.” That means lazy cookers should steer clear of bracket fungi, because it takes some work to tease the flavor outta these babies (ONLY cook the tender edges, the closer to the base you get the woodier your meal will be! And only cook YOUNGEST bracket ‘shrooms you find).

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Genus:Β  Trametes

Species: versicolor

Edibility: Edible with work, not choice

 

*Disclaimer: This site is provided for informational purposes only. Taylor assumes no responsibility or liability for any consequences of readers’ actions. Though every reasonable effort is made to present current and accurate information, identifications may be incorrect (Taylor is an amateur) – but that’s where community input helps! Please, feel free to correct misinformation you find (or just add your two cents) in the comments!
Happy foraging!

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(Forageworthy) Fungi Flashback Friday: Pleurotus ostreatus*

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Pleurotus ostreatus

It’s (F)FFF Time!

You may remember this image from a post I made earlier πŸ™‚

I fondly recall the dinner made from these oysters. I’ve had store-bought oysters and their flavor pales in comparison. How did I verify their edibility? Scent and physical characteristics like gill structure and surrounding environment (is it growing on a dead piece of wood? What kind of tree is the wood from? This stump was from an oak tree). Fried these babies with garlic, tasted JUST like bacon!

Find more info to help you forage safely here (I love this site): http://www.mushroomexpert.com/pleurotus_ostreatus.html

πŸ„πŸ’“πŸ„

Genus: Pleurotus

Species: ostreatus

Edibility: Choice

 

 

*Disclaimer: The information on this site is provided for informational purposes only. You should consult a doctor or mycologist for any medical or scientific advice concerning the fungi covered here. Tjdevarie.com assumes no responsibility or liability for any consequence resulting directly or indirectly for any action or inaction you take based on or made in reliance on the information, services, or material on or linked to this site. Though every reasonable effort is made to present current and accurate information, identifications may be incorrect (Taylor is an amateur), but that’s where community input helps. Please, feel free to correct misinformation you find (or just add your two cents) in the comments!
Happy foraging!

The Superheroes Beneath Your Feet

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Pleurotus ostreatus growing on a dead tree stump

Do you want to help reverse the damage we humans have inflicted upon the Earth?

Interested in learning what you can do in your own backyard to remediate the Earth’s natural cycles of nutrients, which humans have disrupted with factories upon industries upon capitalism?

If we don’t protect the Earth’s biodiversity, we’ll have to say goodbye to many of the organisms we enjoy today, including all flowers and fruit.

Mycoremediation, which is use of fungi as a bioremedy to eat up plastics and other contaminants, is one solution – one we can all participate in every now and then. With a little sweat, we can preserve soil diversity so that our children will know the joys of reaping literal fruits of their hard labor. Read more at Ctenidium [ten-ID-ee-um].